Thank you all for such a wonderful Black Friday and Cyber Monday! Orders of $25 or more use code: FREESHIP for free shipping! Thank you all so much! * We are accepting manual orders for international print orders with payment via BTC (prints shipped inside letters with a stamp). Please email us at OregonHighSpores@gmail.com, thank you. * Please click this banner or navigate below for our Announcements. * We ship SAME or NEXT business day, Monday-Saturday.

Spore Print: Psilocybe cyanescens, Northwest Oregon
Spore Print: Psilocybe cyanescens, Northwest Oregon
Spore Print: Psilocybe cyanescens, Northwest Oregon
Spore Print: Psilocybe cyanescens, Northwest Oregon
Spore Print: Psilocybe cyanescens, Northwest Oregon
Spore Print: Psilocybe cyanescens, Northwest Oregon
Spore Print: Psilocybe cyanescens, Northwest Oregon
Spore Print: Psilocybe cyanescens, Northwest Oregon
Spore Print: Psilocybe cyanescens, Northwest Oregon
Spore Print: Psilocybe cyanescens, Northwest Oregon

Spore Print: Psilocybe cyanescens, Northwest Oregon

Regular price
$14.99
Sale price
$9.99
Unit price
per 
Shipping calculated at checkout.

ONE (1) Spore Print of Psilocybe cyanescens from the coast of Northwest Oregon. Deposits were obtained from fruits flushing in lower-lying sandy areas closer inland than the dunes that produce Ps azurescens, while still sharing an almost-overlapping habitat with the coastal pine tree line. On their other side, approximately 50 yards away, were the crashing waves of the Pacific as they entered the bay and brought with them ample wood.

Notable differences include vast difference in color schemes; cyanescens stayed reddish-brown and ruddy, while azurescens fruiting nearby exhibited pale yellow, a change in color scheme that sticks with them as they drop off the west coast and go back to sleep. Cyans seem to lose the dark-red ruddy color the further *North* you go, and can sometimes be pale beige or light brown in West and Northwest Washington.

*EDIT/UPDATE: I remembered writing this while out photographing this year (2020), so I made sure to get you guys some 2020 West WA Coast Ps. cyanescens prints. 2021 are coming soon, once this heat wave abates. * EDIT/OTHER UPDATE: This listing was originally for our "West Oregon" collection. We have found collections further south which line up more with this geographical descriptor. Thus, our "West Oregon" are "Northwest Oregon" moving forward. We anticipate utilizing areas south of Tillamook County for "West Oregon" starting this year.

The larger specimens were collected in microclimates a bit more into the pines, favoring ferns and fallen, long grasses among slight deciduous leaf litter. These larger specimens had incredibly long life spans, were thick, heavy, approximately 10-20 grams each. Some went from the cap at my fingertips to the stem close to my elbow. They are quite possibly the largest Psilocybe I have ever collected. Only one West Washington specimen came close to the gigantism exhibited from these cyans, which were excruciatingly difficult to remove from the tough moss/roots/wood that they hung onto. I almost didn't think they were Psilocybe at first. They were voracious, hardy, heavy, pretty and didn't seem to either dry out nor rot fast.

I estimate some of the specimens in these pine patches to be more than a few weeks old, perhaps almost a month or longer, in the drier area of these pines. They had incredible staying power the way the dry, cold air whipped through the pines. Most were on trails used by humans, some scarce smaller patches presumably from small mammals, birds and wind.

Some of the larger specimens were growing simply in pine litter. There seemed to be enough nutrition in small pockets in the woven-together pine needles. Often I could slightly disturb the top layer of needles and there is a small wet wiggle you feel as the caps bounce back. Some were completely fruited and done growing below the surface, which only increases in likelihood as it gets colder. These are the only type of cyanescens that are on par with azurescens for stipe length.

Spore deposits retrieved from wild specimens, and may be representative of their natural flora and fauna in slide view. That is to say, you may notice other things than spores when using your microscope. Only healthy, mature, fresh specimens were used to retrieve deposits; free of rot, bugs, infection or other undesirables.

 

Pictured: Psilocybe cyanescens var West Oregon Coast Nov 2019, wild specimens. Also pictured: specimens from the same area and patches, 2014-2018. Last image is Ps. ovoid var Portland, OR Spring 2020.